Cholesterol

Cholesterol

Aerobic exercise is known to be effective in managing blood lipids in various populations with cardiovascular disease. In an early randomized trial (Tsai et al., 2003), individuals with dyslipidemia showed significant improvement in cholesterol, triglycerides, those performing Yang-style three times per week for 12 weeks had higher low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and lower high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol compared to a sedentary controls. When compared to usual care, middle-aged adults with dyslipidemia had significant decreases of 26.3% in triglycerides, 7.3% in total cholesterol, and 11.9% in LDL after 12 months of Yang-style three times per week (Lan, Su, Chen, Lai, 2008). In a randomized study using Chen-style three times per week for 12 weeks (Chen, Ueng, Lee, Sun, Lee, 2010), obese patients with type 2 diabetes and elevated lipid profiles experienced significantly improved triglycerides and HDL when compared to conventional exercise. In persons without abnormal lipid profiles, clinically significant changes in lipids would not be possible because of floor effects. For example, after 12 months of Chen-style, no significant differences in lipid profiles were found in healthy adults with borderline or normal lipid profiles at the baseline relative to resistance training or control groups (Thomas et al., 2005).